7 posts categorized "Rock Interviews "

May 26, 2011

What Executive Coach and Author Scott Eblin Learned from His Rock

Billye, Tim’s Grandma, raised him from the age of 5 and became his "rock" in life. She taught him principles that grounded him and helped him succeed later as an adult. Her influence, words and love had profound effect on Tim’s life and inspired his book "Today We Are Rich." Think of a particular person who has had a similar impact on your life. Who was that person and how did, or do, you know them?

My grandfather, Leonard Eblin.  To me, he was Pa-Pa..


How did they help to shape your life or life philosophies?

Before I was born, Pa-Pa was a Scoutmaster who took troops of Scouts to Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico on a regular basis.  When I was old enough as a little guy to understand what he was doing, I desperately wanted to go to Philmont with him.  Of course, I wasn't old enough to do that as a six or seven year old but as soon as I was old enough I joined the Cub Scouts because that was the way I'd get to do what Pa-Pa was doing.  That path eventually led to me becoming an Eagle Scout.  Like they say, once an Eagle Scout, always an Eagle Scout.  The tenets of the Scout Law, trustworthy, brave, loyal, thrifty, brave, clean, reverent and all the rest have been guideposts for me throughout my life.


Tell us about a specific lesson you learned from them, or a piece of advice they gave to you?

My grandfather was very practical.  Two lessons from him really stick with me.  First, when you're camping in cold weather, always change out of the clothes you wore all day before getting into your sleeping bag. The reason is the sweat that's retained in your clothes from the activity of the day will give you the chills at night.  The second big lesson from Pa-Pa is to serve others.  He was 93 when he died and he helped build over 50 houses for Habitat for Humanity between ages 75 and 85.  I'm still a lot younger than that but aspire to serve in the way he did.


Have you ever drifted away from their grounding advice?  What price did you pay? 

There have certainly been times when I've been more focused on the extrinsic markers of success than the more intrinsic ones I learned from Pa-Pa.  I don't have any dramatic stories of failure from those times but definitely recognize the difference in my overall peace of mind and happiness.

 

Find out more about Leonard Eblin at http://scotteblin.typepad.com/blog/2008/08/a-good-scout.html

Find out more about Scott Eblin, executive coach and author of The Next Level: What Insiders Know About Executive Success at:

www.eblingroup.com  (company site)
www.scotteblin.com (leadership blog)
@scotteblin  (Twitter)
The Eblin Group (Facebook) 

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Scott-eblin From Tim Sander's to Scott's grandfather, Leonard Eblin, we want to thank you for helping make Scott who he is today. You have helped make the world a better place.

 
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This interview is part of a series of interviews focusing on some of the great Rocks that have influenced our lives. Just as Tim's new Book, Today We Are Rich, shares what he learned from his rock, Billye, we want to pass on the knowledge of some other great rocks out there.

Rock on! Be a Rock, or applaud a Rock you know. 

Was your grandma your Rock, or did she have some grate advice? Tell us on Great Stuff My Grandma Said.


May 06, 2011

Don't Forget To Thank Your Real Mom On Sunday

TimMom08 mid
Not all 'mothers' are created equal.  Mine is pretty special. 

Like many of you, I have more than one mom: Biological and Real.  The former got pregnant forty nine years ago, had me and went on with her life.  The latter took me in when I was turning five and nurtured me.  Which one is Mother's Day for? 

I'm not the only guy or gal that was mothered by a grandmother, aunt, family friend, in-law or mentor.  I believe we should thank all Real Moms this Sunday for their contribution and love.  You know who I'm talking about.  In many cases, you  might be the only one giving gratitude to her this year.  Let's make sure we embrace the spirit of Mother's Day: Appreciation. 

It's our real moms that give us values, confidence and perspective.  They push, pull, primp and prepare us for our best life.  Too many successful people point to authors, gurus and role models when describing 'their secret to success.'  In my case, I point to Billye, my real mom.  

Sure, in Today We Are Rich, she's included as my grandmother, but that's just being technical for the sake of the reader experience.  As I said at the end of the book, she LOVES it when I call her mom, as she likes to say: "That's one of the sweetest words in the world to me.  I raised you as my son!" 

So pick up the phone, get in the car or go buy a gift for your real mom.  She deserves to be recognized for the Ripple Effect her love has made on your life as well as everyone you touch. 

 


May 05, 2011

Rock Interview: Emmy winner & founder of The Local Tourist Theresa Carter credits her parents for her success

Billye, Tim’s Grandma, raised him from the age of 5 and became his "rock" in life. She taught him principles that grounded him and helped him succeed later as an adult. Her influence, words and love had profound effect on Tim’s life and inspired his book "Today We Are Rich." Can you think of a particular person who has had a similar impact on your life? Who was that person and how did, or do, you know them?

My parents have truly inspired me. They're very different people, but combined they've given me a drive to do something special with my life. 

 

How did they help to shape your life or life philosophies?

Both of them have amazing work ethics and insatiable curiosity. My mother's a CPA who completed her college degree when I was in Junior High and my brother in elementary school. I remember quizzing her as she'd drive me to school in the morning! She's always been the rock of our family and the one who keeps us all together. My dad's an artist and I credit my entrepreneurial spirit to him. When I was growing up he'd be painting all day and way into the night. Over the years he's switched mediums a few times, but his work ethic and his drive for perfection have remained the same.  

The two of them also love to travel, and the way they travel has helped form the direction of my business, The Local Tourist. They want to meet the people and find out where they like to go, no matter what city, state, or even country they visit. It's part of that insatiable curiosity and infectious love of life that, to me, defines them.

 

Tell us about a specific lesson you learned from them, or a piece of advice they gave to you?

Know who you are and follow your passion. Mom's is family, so she chose a career path that would allow her to nurture us all. Dad's is art, in any form, and he's tireless in his efforts to create something new and beautiful. Watching these two over the years, and seeing the quality of life they have from following their dreams, has inspired me to pursue my own with the same dedication and passion.

 

Have you ever drifted away from their grounding advice?  What price did you pay? 

My parents both know their strengths and are committed to pursuing them. I've known since I was 10 that I wanted to be a writer, but as I got older I got distracted by all sorts of other things. I wanted to be a musician, or a lawyer, or an air traffic controller, or a ballroom dancer...and on and on. Writing was always there, but it wasn't until I was in my early thirties that I came back to my core strength. On the one hand I feel like I wasted so much time, but on the other if I hadn't then there would be no The Local Tourist.

 

Find out more about Theresa Carter's adventures at: http://thelocaltourist.com

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Theresa From Tim Sander's to Theresa's parents, we want to thank you for helping make Theresa who she is today. You have helped make the world a better place.

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This interview is part of a series of interviews focusing on some of the great Rocks that have influenced our lives. Just as Tim's new Book, Today We Are Rich, shares what he learned from his rock, Billye, we want to pass on the knowledge of some other great rocks out there.

Rock on! Be a Rock, or applaud a Rock you know. 

Was your grandma your Rock, or did she have some grate advice? Tell us on Great Stuff My Grandma Said.

 


April 28, 2011

Dr. Joey Faucette, Speaker, Author & Coach, on his two rocks, his Grandaddy Greene and my dad, Lonnie Faucette

How did they help to shape your life or life philosophies?

 My Grandaddy Greene and my Dad shaped my life both sharing when I would listen and modeling when I was “sideways” to use Tim’s description. Both of these men gave generously to others from their hearts and their wallets, constantly in search of ways to assist others. Gratitude motivated both of them, and they moved about their lives in ways that were humble and grounded in integrity. When either of them told you something they would do for you, all doubt was removed. It would get done. And they expected the same from me as their son and grandson.

Tell us about a specific lesson you learned from them, or a piece of advice they gave to you?

 Grandaddy Greene was a crop farmer, dairy farmer, and ran a country store—at heart, an entrepreneur. Whether planting corn, herding cows, or chewing the fat with the men who hung out around the pot belly stove in his store, my Grandaddy had a respect for all of life that shaped my core values today. His respect for the earth meant that we sought to understand her need to receive as well as give us food. That meant we protected her from erosion, saw to it that her nutrient levels were sustained, and insured she lay fallow when needed. “The land must rest like us,” he said.

 We respected the cows as well, knowing that they gave us more milk when fed appropriately, richer milk when fed well, and always cared for in such a way that prevented illness. And when the heifer bellowed all night because she was separated from her new-born calf, we understood that grief comes to us all.

We respected the men who hung out in the country store even when they didn’t spend a dime. “His crops failed this year,” my Grandaddy explained when I asked why someone took a stick of bologna and hoop of cheese home without paying. “He has children to feed. You will too one day,” he said. “Someone helped me. Now it’s my turn to return the favor.”

He was, at heart, an entrepreneur who respected all of life.

Lonnie Faucette (my dad): His constant refrain to me was, “Son, get all the education you can because no one can ever take it away from you.” This from a man who wasn’t a stellar student in school, repeating the third grade, and just completing his high school diploma. However, as a young man in his early 20s with a new baby (me), he took a job working with computers for a national department store, learning on the job everyday and diligently paying his dues to move up the corporate ladder. Eventually he became a Data Processing Manager and later an IT Director. He was passed over by other corporations for high-profile positions because he lacked a college degree. Yet, he learned informally everything required to excel in his work. Sure, I heeded his advice, eventually completing a doctorate degree. However, my greatest learning was that education comes to those who want to learn in any given situation, formally or informally.

Have you ever drifted away from their grounding advice?  What price did you pay? 

Haven’t we all gone sideways?

When I lost respect for others, I realized one day that I first lost respect for myself. I became confused and thought that I was to be served, not serve. The bitterness and cynicism I experienced at trying to do life my way choked me. Fortunately I caught my breath and began living again. The price for turning blue as I held my breath was my investment—sweat equity—in guaranteeing that I would remain focused on respecting all of life and learning everyday. 

 

Find out more about Dr. Joey Faucette, Speaker, Author & Coach - Receive a free positive story weekdays & discover how to Work Positive at www.ListentoLife.org

 

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DrJoey From Tim Sander's to Dr. Faucette's dad and granddaddy, we want to thank you for helping make Joey who he is today. You have helped make the world a better place.

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This interview is part of a series of interviews focusing on some of the great Rocks that have influenced our lives. Just as Tim's new Book, Today We Are Rich, shares what he learned from his rock, Billye, we want to pass on the knowledge of some other great rocks out there.

Rock on! Be a Rock, or applaud a Rock you know. 


April 21, 2011

What Jim Grillo, CMP of hereschicago.com, has to say about his Rock

Billye, Tim’s Grandma, raised him from the age of 5 and became his "rock" in life. She taught him principles that grounded him and helped him succeed later as an adult. Her influence, words and love had profound effect on Tim’s life and inspired his book "Today We Are Rich." Think of a particular person who has had a similar impact on your life. Who was that person and how did, or do, you know them? How did they help to shape your life or life philosophies?

My dad.  He used to work from home for his company.  He formed my opinion of how work life is supposed to be and it definitely is not in the “rat race” driving in rush hour traffic to and from work and especially punching in a time clock.  Therefore, I sought to do the same and opened up my own home based business www.hereschicago.com which I still run out of my 2nd bedroom every day for the last 7 years.

It instilled comfort and confidence for me as I know there is no other option than to succeed. This helped me to not only start my business, but, helped me stay in my business which allows me the freedom to do make my own decisions personally and professionally, spend time with family and friends and provides flexibility to contribute and give back to our industry with volunteering.

 

Tell us about a specific lesson you learned from them, or a piece of advice they gave to you?

I learned confidence and to instill comfort to others close to me no matter the situation. Since I have comfort and confidence instilled in me from growing up with someone who has conveyed this no matter what, I now convey this to friends, colleagues and family no matter what.  This applies to any situation a friend or colleague discusses with me.  It is my personal obligation to never show fear and to help others channel their fear into progress.

 

Have you ever drifted away from their grounding advice?  What price did you pay? 

Great question.  I am sure that occasionally I drift from his advice as I am only human, however, I have never drifted from the core advice which always keeps me on the road he provided.  I “swerve” once in awhile, but, never drive off the road.

 

Jim Grillo, CMP is an internet entrepreneur and founder of Hereschicago.com, Chicago’s online resource directory featuring Chicago’s top meeting and event venues and event service providers. You can find Jim at:
www.facebook.com/jim.grillo
www.hereschicago.com
HCTV our Video Site Tours
Join our Facebook Page
Follow us on Twitter
Join our Linked In Group
Hereschicago.com You Tube Channel

 

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From Tim Sander's to Jim's dad, we want to thank you for helping make Jim who he is. You have helped make the world a better place.

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This interview is part of a series of interviews focusing on some of the great Rocks that have influenced our lives. Just as Tim's new Book, Today We Are Rich, shares what he learned from his rock, Billye, we want to pass on the knowledge of some other great rocks out there.

Rock on! Be a Rock, or applaud a Rock you know. 

Was your grandma your Rock, or did she have some grate advice? Tell us on Great Stuff My Grandma Said.


April 14, 2011

Nick Nigro, Career Services Director at Davis College, learned from his Rock (and dad), Dominick Nigro

How did your dad help to shape your life or life philosophies?

I am honored to participate in your Rock interview series, and mostly to honor my dad who so gracefully mentored me through my early years as his dedication, humility, and steadfastness helped me and my brothers travel more confidently into adulthood. The simple message that exuded from him was to be concerned about others, lend a hand and learn from your mistakes. His faith was his rock! Yes he was involved in the catholic church in our little town– he ushered at the same mass for years and called bingo weekly while helping with small jobs on the parish grounds. The pastor knew that he could count on my dad when there was a little project (or big one) that needed attention; however, the biggest lesson was how he lived his faith once he got into the car after Mass. My dad did not complete high school as he finished 10th grade and went into the military to serve our country in World War II (he and four of his brothers served at the same time – he had three sisters, too). My grandparents, on my dad’s side, raised a family of eight by selling popcorn and peanuts and repairing shoes. Everyone respected my dad as he treated people kindly and fairly. 

His sense of humor was clear and always brought a smile to people’s face. That was what he said in almost every card he and my mom gave to us as we were growing up – keep a smile on your face. He continues to inspire me in my work and at home. I am named after my dad – I’m a junior. I was born when my dad was 43 and my daughter was born when I was 43. How fun! I wear a tie every day to work at Davis College where I serve as the Director of Career Services. It may be out of fashion; but I wear a tie clip that belonged to my dad. I know that if I don’t hold the door for someone or extend a helping hand, or give a sincere compliment my dad’s spirit will admonish me and call me to that higher standard. He was the perfect gentleman and it was clear that he was kind and caring. 

I know that when I forget the values that were instilled in me that I stray from living the way my dad (and mom) raised me to live. It was their deep and simple faith that encouraged me to live a life a service and to develop mutually valuable relationships so that we can make our community a better place for all of us to live. In everything I do the question is: How can I help you? He is my rock!

 

Can you tell us about a specific lesson you learned from him, or a piece of advice he gave to you?

My dad was a man of few words. However, he knew how to make people laugh and bring appropriate humor to even the most serious situation. He was a story teller whether it was a humorous story or a story from his growing up years. He was the king of the one-liners as well as those heart warming stories from World War II in the fox holes, or sports when he beat the ping pong champion in small town where he grew up who was always bragging how good he was – dad seized the opportunity to teach humility. Dad taught me to keep a smile on my face and the faces of others. To this day, I am a joke teller and a one-liner guy myself. When I give presentations or am conversing with friends or colleagues, I use stories – lots of them. That was a trait that I got from my dad.

 

Have you ever drifted away from his grounding advice? What price did you pay?

There was a spell in my life where I lost or forgot my sense of humor. I became depressed and more critical, pessimistic, and judgmental – I was usually upbeat and very positive. Those were unhappy times and I wasn’t the happiest person to be around. The depression was at times overwhelming. That really got my attention and thank God I had people around me who supported me and really cared. Once I realized that I had ventured off my path, my smile and energy came back. Sure, I get depressed now and again, however, my dad’s inspiration reminds me to get back to who I am.

 

Find out more about Nick Nigro at:
http://twitter.com/nickatdavis
nnigro (at) daviscollege.edu
www.daviscollege.edu
800-477-7021, x. 143

 

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From Tim Sander's to Nick's dad, Dominick, we want to thank you for helping make Nick who he is today. You have helped make the world a better place.

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This interview is part of a series of interviews focusing on some of the great Rocks that have influenced our lives. Just as Tim's new Book, Today We Are Rich, shares what he learned from his rock, Billye, we want to pass on the knowledge of some other great rocks out there.

Rock on! Be a Rock, or applaud a Rock you know. 

 


April 07, 2011

What Aspiring Author, Avid Aviator and Eternal Optimist Martin Pigg Learned From Watching His Rock in Action

My “Rock” has always been my mom, Kathy. Sheʼs the perfect example of a spiritual being having a human experience. All that I know and share with the world about love, courage, faith, compassion, kindness, fairness, perseverance and joy, Iʼve learned from watching her move through the world with grace and with love for the people she has met along her path in life.

Called to the ministry in the early ʻ70s, when women werenʼt “supposed” to be ministers, I watched as her pioneering spirit and loving heart helped to blaze a trail for other women who felt that God was calling them to the ministry as well. I saw her stand firm in her convictions and her faith as male ministers and many members of the churches she served did and said whatever they could to discourage her from continuing to serve God and the church.

Honoring her call to ministry, I saw the faces of so many elderly men and women light up as she entered their hospital rooms, close to death but knowing that a friend had just come through the door. Then I would watch as she held their hands and touched their faces and said a prayer for them as they gently slipped from this world to the next.

After she retired a few years ago, I watched as she followed her second calling as an artist. Sheʼs an accomplished painter, potter and published poet with a passion for creating digital art with her iPhone and her iPad. She creates stunningly beautiful and meaningful works of art with them and finds so much joy in working with kids and adults to show them how they too can use technology to discover their inner artist. Soon to be 72 years young, she has a thirst for life and learning that inspires me every day.

Mom has always been my most trusted resource for advice, except for the ten years after college when I though that I knew it all. I didnʼt seek her advice on several important life decisions and the decisions that I made extracted a heavy emotional price from me for many years thereafter.

Through all of my missteps, and as painful as it must have been for her to see me suffer, she never criticized me or judged me. She let me be me and she was there to love me and lend a hand when I needed her the most.

I would say that the act of allowing people to be who they are, without judgement or criticism is probably one of the most important things I have learned from my mom. The path that Iʼm on now is due primarily to the example she has set with her life for my entire life.

Find out more about Martin Pigg at:
http://whenpiggsfly.com
http://martinpigg.com
http://twitter.com/martinpigg

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From Tim Sander's to Martin's mom, Kathy, we want to thank you for helping make Martin who he is today. You have helped make the world a better place.

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This interview is part of a series of interviews focusing on some of the great Rocks that have influenced our lives. Just as Tim's new Book, Today We Are Rich, shares what he learned from his rock, Billye, we want to pass on the knowledge of some other great rocks out there.

Rock on! Be a Rock, or applaud a Rock you know.